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Humor is Therapeutic

Laughter in the Fast Lane One summer evening long ago, my wife and I were sitting in traffic on the freeway, not moving an inch and late for a dinner engagement in San Francisco, feeling frustrated and angry. Both of us were busy telling ourselves a story: the freeway would not be at a standstill […]

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Practice Loving Self-Care

“Self-care” is a straightforward term that encompasses any action we take to nurture our health. Finding the right physicians to help us manage our conditions, receiving appropriate treatments, eating nourishing foods, and getting sufficient rest are all examples of self-care. But what is loving self-care?  When we practice loving self-care, we give ourselves the gift […]

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Video: “Fighting Cancer: A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment”

Psychophysiologist Erik Peper, PhD, discusses the book he co-authored with cancer researcher Robert Gorter, MD. He describes a novel, promising, nontoxic treatment for cancer, the results of which, have been quite exciting. In line with the actual pathophysiological process of all disease, these authors view cancer as a failure of the immune system. This is […]

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Practice Humor for Health and Wellbeing

Learn to view thoughts as nothing but passing brain phenomena. For those of us living with chronic health problems, it’s important not to take ourselves and our medical situation too seriously. Worrying or agonizing about our health challenges isn’t helpful—in fact it’s deleterious to our health—so it’s highly beneficial to learn to see the humor […]

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Practice Gratitude To Increase Well-Being

Gratitude has been defined by research psychologist Robert Emmons as a felt sense of wonder, thankfulness, and appreciation for life. He found that when we practice gratitude, we benefit by becoming better able to elevate our mood simply by recalling memories of being grateful. When grateful people are asked about past events, they tend to […]

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Video: Mastery Through Conscious Breathing Practices

In this interview of Dr. Erik Peper, we discuss the power of Tumo breathing. This form of conscious breathing has been studied by Dr. Herbert Benson of Harvard and many other Western researchers. It is a special form of conscious respiration that increases metabolic rate and allows Buddhist monks and others who practice it to […]

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When Experiential Avoidance Is Healthy

Recently, I’ve been addressing the dangers of how cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance can prevent us from living in full contact with our present moment, lived experiences. However, there are situations where going into a trance and escaping our current experience serve a useful function. For example, when experiencing a dangerous, harmful situation over which […]

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Health Effects of Avoidance Versus Acceptance

Effects on Health: The Physiology of Avoidance Versus Acceptance Now let’s take a look at the effects of experiential avoidance on health so we can see why it is so important for those of us with chronic medical conditions to become aware of experiential avoidance and strive to reduce it in our lives. Our health […]

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Video: Experiments in Mind Control for Health with Neurofeedback

In this discussion with Dr. Erik Peper, we explore the frontier of psychophysiological self-regulation. Dr. Peper talks about the research he did in the late 60s and early 70s on EEG alpha training. He describes how he learned to turn off alpha brain rhythms in one hemisphere and turn them on in the other. At […]

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Avoidance of Thoughts and Feelings is Unhealthy

Experiential Avoidance and Intimacy In recent posts, I have discussed the concept of experiential avoidance, which is the conscious or unconscious avoidance of unpleasant thoughts, feelings, and feared life activities. A simple example of experiential avoidance would involve staying home instead of going out because of anxiety or depression. As I’ve pointed out before, avoident […]

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