Charismatic Mindfulness

 

Tag Archives | emotional suppression
Video: Meaningful Relationships Reduce Odds of Developing Cancer

Video: Meaningful Relationships Reduce Odds of Developing Cancer

In one of the longest-running prospective studies, 1300 medical students at Johns Hopkins were followed for forty years.  While at Hopkins they were given psychological tests exploring the ability of the students to have meaningful relationships.  Thirty years later, the researchers discovered that those who had developed cancer were the same ones who had reported the greatest lack of closeness in their families of origin.  Those who had developed cancer also turned […]

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Q & A with Dr. B.

The purpose of this website, my book, and the Community Education course I teach at the College of Marin, is to teach people how to live a vibrant, meaningful life through the cultivation of self-empowerment and self-efficacy. In this weekly Q&A column, I post questions from students and from people who attend my presentations along […]

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How Your Thinking Affects Your Health Part 3 of 3

Part 3 of 3 Increased emotional distress results in the release of catecholamines (substances allowing us to respond to stressors), which is damaging to the intimal endothelium (inner-most lining) of the coronary arteries. That, in turn, leads to release of free fatty acids, which results in increased platelet aggregation and lipid deposition at the site […]

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Health Effects of Avoidance Versus Acceptance

Effects on Health: The Physiology of Avoidance Versus Acceptance Now let’s take a look at the effects of experiential avoidance on health so we can see why it is so important for those of us with chronic medical conditions to become aware of experiential avoidance and strive to reduce it in our lives. Our health […]

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Authentic Self-Expression and Health Part 2

During the 1950s, psychologist Lawrence LeShan discovered that one way he could know his psychotherapy sessions with hospitalized patients were working was that the nursing staff would begin to complain about those patients—once deemed compliant, his most successful patients were now labeled “difficult” or “noncompliant.” Suddenly, for example, when a nurse entered to do a […]

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