CLICK HERE to Sign Up for EMAIL NEWSLETTERS and get a FREE PREVIEW of "In Your Own Hands: New Hope..."
Archive | Mindfulness Practice RSS feed for this section

The Slippery Slope of Optimism

Optimism is the single most frequently cited attribute of healthy and happy people. But who is truly optimistic? Research psychologist Martin Seligman found that, to be effective, optimism must be embodied. Putting up a false front of optimism isn’t enough. In fact, trying to be optimistic can create emotional distress, which can then negatively impact […]

Read full story

Who Gets Well?

 What science studies the effects of mind on immune function? Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) researchers explore the relationship of cognition and emotion to nervous, endocrine, and immune system functioning. This field was born in the early 1980s when new technology allowed researchers to make the amazing discovery that throughout the body, there are nerve receptors on immune […]

Read full story

Intentionality and Health

  Mindfulness practice allows us to develop the ability to observe and experience our thoughts, sensations, and emotions non-judgmentally, non-analytically, and with complete, unconditional acceptance.  This practice is an antidote to anxiety and depression, improves brain function, and is conducive to health and well-being.  Along with mindfulness practice, intentionality is an effective catalyst to health […]

Read full story

Loving Self-Care and Health

Loving self-care, as I am using the term, means giving oneself the gift of presence while engaged in the activities of self-care. Some of us who live with chronic illness spend a lot of time engaged in self-care, and our state of mind during that time affects the results of that self-care.  Imagine caring for […]

Read full story

Improve Health and Happiness by Setting and Pursuing Goals

Goals Energize Us. During my three years at the Simonton Cancer Center, we always impressed upon patients that energy is essential to healing and that the act of pursuing goals can be extremely energizing. Setting goals helps us conceptualize our reasons for living and get clarity on what gives our lives meaning and purpose. In […]

Read full story

The Fine Line Between Striving and Nonattachment to Outcomes

When living with a chronic debilitating medical condition, it is essential to do everything possible in terms of diet, exercise and rest. It is also essential to do everything possible to find meaning and purpose, to increase social support, and to do whatever it takes to develop environmental mastery—the sense of being in control of […]

Read full story

Why Suffer Unnecessarily?

In Mindfulness-and Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapies in Practice, research psychologists Lizabeth Roemer and Susan Orsillo teach that unnecessary suffering results from three related mechanisms: 1. An unhealthy relationship to our inner subjective experiences, consisting of one or more of the following: a. Cognitive fusion—an overidentification with our thoughts, emotions, images, and sensations b. Judgment—criticism of self […]

Read full story

Danger: Cognitive Fusion!

Cognitive fusion is the state of mind in which we are so fused with our thoughts that they appear to be synonymous with fact. Most suffering in the world is the result of being fused to our beliefs.  In this state, we have such strong identification with and/or attachment to our thoughts and beliefs that […]

Read full story

Psychotherapy to Treat Medical Conditions?

We normally go to psychotherapists for help with psychological issues and go to physicians for help with medical issues. However, new research in psychoneuroimmunology and neuropsychology reveals direct connections between health and happiness.  In my 3-years of training at the Simonton Cancer Center, it became very clear to me that behind all the tools that […]

Read full story

The Connection Between Mood and Cancer

In a large prospective study by research psychologist Richard Shekelle and his team at the Western Electric plant in Chicago, 2,010 middle-aged male employees were given psychological tests that looked specifically at depression scores. The men were followed for seventeen years. The men who had tested as depressed developed cancers over the course of the […]

Read full story